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The Night of the Hunter (1955)
The Night of the Hunter (1955)
1955 | Drama, Mystery
10.0 (4 Ratings)
Movie Favorite

"A masterpiece visually and in so many ways, but also a tragedy as Charles Laughton only directed this one film. Robert Mitchum is so rivetingly magnetic."

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The Night of the Hunter (1955)
The Night of the Hunter (1955)
1955 | Drama, Mystery
10.0 (4 Ratings)
Movie Favorite

"A very theatrical construct of noir. Black humor, nursery rhymes, expressionist lighting, a zoological boat ride, Shelly Winters underwater, and Robert Mitchum cackling when getting shot. I can hear Charles Laughton chuckling in every scene. Best use of frightening artifice. If Mitchum only acted in one movie, if Gish only appeared in one movie, they should be proud for this to be the one. As it is, Laughton only directed one."

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Hobson's Choice (1983)
Hobson's Choice (1983)
1983 | Comedy
(0 Ratings)
Movie Favorite

"I’ve never been a huge fan of David Lean’s epics and think the modest British films he did in the 1940s are superior. I also wouldn’t have thought he had a glimmer of humor, but this film is witty, and the actors (even Charles Laughton) have been directed with insight."

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The Night of the Hunter (1955)
The Night of the Hunter (1955)
1955 | Drama, Mystery
10.0 (4 Ratings)
Movie Favorite

"Again, another adult fairytale, and like Eyes Without a Face, a one-off. It is a loss to cinema that Charles Laughton never got another chance to direct a film. The Night of the Hunter shows such a willingness to do things in his own highly stylized and theatrical manner, I can’t imagine where he could have gone from there. Still, if you’re going to make one film, it might as well be as unforgettable as this."

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Mogwai recommended Night Hunter (1995) in Movies (curated)

 
Night Hunter (1995)
Night Hunter (1995)
1995 | Action, Horror
(0 Ratings)
Movie Favorite

"I absolutely love this film. Robert Mitchum is incredible as a serial killer roving about in the guise of a preacher. It's the only film Charles Laughton directed, which, on the evidence of this film, is a real shame, as he seemed to have a real flair for it. There are a lot of great performances, and you can't help but wonder if Laughton’s vast experience as an actor helped him get the best out of his cast."

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Island of Lost Souls (1933)
Island of Lost Souls (1933)
1933 | Classics, Horror, Sci-Fi
8.3 (4 Ratings)
Movie Favorite

"Yeah, and The Island of Lost Souls is amazing, from 1932 with Charles Laughton as Dr. Moreau. That movie is amazing. That movie’s dark. For anyone who hasn’t seen it, the extras — I mean, even now you watch like, this is really disturbing. The extras are supposed to be the half-man/half-animal people. You can tell they got really bizarre-looking extras before they did the makeup, and everybody looks like they’re deformed and f—ed up. Again, Lugosi plays the leader of the beast men. He’s not in it a lot, but of course he has the line that everybody remembers about the House of Pain: “He who breaks the law goes back to the House of Pain.” He’s in the movie for five minutes and steals the movie. Charles Laughton is incredible. But it’s demented again. The basic premise is a crazy one. They have the beast men and they’re being operated on and just screaming. It’s like, “This is not fun.” You have little kids running out of the theater in tears, or adults. It’s amazing. Still amazing. The cinematography’s amazing. Everything about it is just incredible."

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The Night of the Hunter (1955)
The Night of the Hunter (1955)
1955 | Drama, Mystery
10.0 (4 Ratings)
Movie Favorite

"The Night of the Hunter was Charles Laughton?s only film as a director and its poor reception pretty much killed his directing career. It?s a remarkable debut and there?s no other film quite like it. It?s very reliant on imager from back in the days of D.W. Griffith and it?s strikingly designed and extremely dark. I saw it at a kiddie matinee when I was a child and I was just terrified. It has such a fairy tale atmosphere about it that it probably speaks more directly to children than it does to adults."

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The Night of the Hunter (1955)
The Night of the Hunter (1955)
1955 | Drama, Mystery
10.0 (4 Ratings)
Movie Favorite

"Robert Mitchum stars in his signature role as the demonic preacher Harry Powell. The great actor Charles Laughton’s only work as a director is a horrifying fable about the loss of innocence and the darkness barely contained beneath the veneer of American pastoral life. It’s a one-of-a-kind movie. There’s nothing like it. Powerful, beautiful, darkly funny. Visually stunning. Both expressionistic and harshly realistic. It’s an American fever dream that I don’t think was equaled until David Lynch launched Blue Velvet into an unsuspecting Reagan-era public three decades later. The disc features Charles Laughton Directs “The Night of the Hunter,” a deconstruction of the film featuring outtakes and behind-the-scenes footage that enhances the experience of an already perfect film in ways unimaginable. Compiled by the UCLA Film and Television Archive, it’s a special feature as good as the film itself."

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More Bawdy Cockney Songs, Vol. II by Elsa Lanchester
More Bawdy Cockney Songs, Vol. II by Elsa Lanchester
2012 | Comedy
6.0 (2 Ratings)
Album Favorite

"True, other Elsa Lanchester albums have her husband Charles Laughton introducing each track, but only this one has both "When a Lady Has a Piazza" and "If You Peek in My Gazebo." Lanchester, most famous for playing the Bride of Frankenstein (technically, the bride of Frankenstein's monster) and Laughton's wife in Witness For The Prosecution, has an actor's voice, with perfect stage-Cockney enunci-OY-tion, which is perfect for this material. "Please sell no more drink to my father. It makes him so strange and so wild. Heed the prayer of my heart-broken mother, and pity the poor drunkard's child." She sings this with such relish, it's easy to see whose side she's really on. "

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Island of Lost Souls (1933)
Island of Lost Souls (1933)
1933 | Classics, Horror, Sci-Fi
8.3 (4 Ratings)
Movie Favorite

"As an anticolonialism fable it’s extremely on the nose, but whatever. Guys, just . . . Colonialism: Don’t Do It. What is totally unforgettable about this film is the photography: constant fogs, blooming white surfaces, and inky jungle shadows. There’s a shot of the hero and the Panther Woman reflected in a pool of rippling water, then her real foot dips into the frame—it makes me gasp. There’s Bela Lugosi’s imperious, rabbinical presence as the Sayer of the Law. And most importantly, there’s Charles Laughton, obviously delighting in the role, giving the British scientist/eugenicist a sadistic perviness that I’m sure wasn’t in the script. In one moment, in the midst of threatening the hero, he just sprawls his whole body across a table, like a happy fat cat."

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